Vermont Vital Records

Vermont Vital Records

In the state of Vermont, the Office of Vital Records is in charge of maintaining all state level vital files, including records based on people’s important life events, such as births, deaths, marriages, and divorces. The vital records relating to these key life events can include divorce decrees, divorce certificates and other divorce records, birth certificates, death certificates, marriage licenses, marriage certificates. Files are stored together in one central record registry to be used for statistical analysis.

Divorce Records

Divorce records are handed out by government officials in the state of Vermont, only after the event in question is registered. In Vermont, divorce records are collected by the Vermont Department of Health and Vital Statistics, as well as the Vermont State Archives and Records Administration. When a person/couple files for a divorce/annulment in the state of Vermont, records of it are stored along with other key state vital records in one central registry. These important records may include divorce certificates and divorce decrees, as well as other divorce-related files. It depends on the state itself as to whether these files can be accessed and copied by the public. A copy of a divorce document in the state of Vermont costs $10. There were 1,937 divorces in the state of Vermont in 2016.

Marriage Records

Like divorce records, marriage records are issued by government officials in Vermont after the wedding is registered. The earliest registrations of marriages date back as far as the 1770s, a time linked with the state’s earliest permanent settlements. Marriage records usually include the name of the bride, the name of the groom, the date and location of the wedding, the hometowns of the couple, and all four parents. Existing marriage records dating back to that time are kept at the Vermont Family Search Historical Records and the Vermont Marriages Collection. In modern day Vermont, divorce records are collected by the Vermont Department of Health and Vital Statistics, as well as the Vermont State Archives and Records Administration. A copy of a marriage document in the state of Vermont costs $10. There were 5,190 marriages in the state of Vermont in 2016.

Birth Records

Birth records usually refer to the certificates issued upon the birth of every child in Vermont, or a certified copy of this document. The earliest registered births in the state date back to 1760, a time linked to the first permanent settlements in Vermont. These early records were collected from clerk’s offices, church registers, and county records. These can be found at the relevant Vermont Town Clerk and the Vermont Vital and Town Records. Modern day birth records are collected and stored by the Vermont State Archives and Records Administration. A copy of a birth document in the state of Vermont costs $10. There were 5,756 births in the state of Vermont in 2016.

Death Records

Death records usually refer to the copy of information from a persons death certificate after they pass away. The earliest registered deaths in Vermont sate back to the 1760s, as early as the settlement in question was permanent. All of these early records were collected and stored by church registers in the relevant county. Modern day death records are collected and stored by the Vermont State Archives and Records Administration and Vermont Family Search Historical Records. A copy of a death document in the state of Vermont costs $10. There were 5,908 deaths in the state of Vermont in 2016.

Why are these records available to the public?

The Vermont Public Records Law was passed back in 1970, with the latest amendments coming in the year 2000. This law aimed to ensure that all residents of Vermont could access all public records at will. All records held by the state or local government can be accessed and copied by members of the public, as long as it is not prohibited by another law.

To access records:

Department of Health
108 Cherry Street
Burlington, VT 05402

(800) 464-4343

(802) 863-7200

http://www.healthvermont.gov/about/contact

Vermont State Archives

State Archives

Contact: (802) 471-1101

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Vermont

Vermont

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